A moral and religious people

April 1, 2011
By

My favorite John Adams quote is this:

“Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

A moral people includes respect for the rule of law and nowhere is that more important at the ballot box.

Republicans on the House Administration Committee want to shore up voter registration rules in the wake of a Colorado study that found as many as 5,000 non-citizens in the state took part in last year’s election.

Rep. Gregg Harper (R-Miss.), the panel’s chairman, called the study “a disturbing wake-up call” that should cause every state to review its safeguards to prevent illegal voting.

“We simply cannot have an electoral system that allows thousands of non-citizens to violate the law and vote in our elections. We must do more to protect the integrity of our electoral processes,” Harper added.

Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler, a Republican, told the panel that his department’s study identified nearly 12,000 people who were not citizens but were still registered to vote in Colorado.

Of those non-citizen registered voters, nearly 5,000 took part in the 2010 general election in which Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet narrowly defeated Republican John Buck.

Voter identification and verification of eligibility is an absolute must.

The survival of an open and free democratic society depends upon the character of the individual, not on the collective qualities of any group. In a perfect world, verification of eligibility would not be necessary because people would self select if they were not eligible – unfortunately, as evidenced in the snippet from The Hill above, we do not live in perfect times.

36 Responses to A moral and religious people

  1. Rex Magnus Trollius on April 1, 2011 at 5:45 am

    Republicans being concerned about voting rights and laws. Hilarious. Just another example of a made-up problem designed to advance a partisan or corporatist cause: Democratic voter suppression.

    Being lectured to about America by Anti-American traitors and ex-patriots like yourself is galling.

  2. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 6:13 am

    If that’s all it takes to make your nostrils quiver and your spincter tighten, you’ve got some tough days ahead of you, my communist friend.

    But it’s good to know we’ve got you and those like you to defend America. The best and the brightest and the cream of the crop.

    That should make everyone feel much better.

  3. utahprez on April 1, 2011 at 6:28 am

    Rexie:

    What is hilarious is that you assumed that these ineligible voters were Democrats! Too damn funny. The Secretary of State of Colorado’s report didn’t say that they voted Democrat, just that they were ineligible to vote.

    Guess it just proves that it isn’t a problem as long as they vote your way.

    Projecting much? I think so…

  4. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 6:52 am

    Hey, dude, I know it’s on the wrong thread, but after your scintillating explanation of economics and gasoline prices, I wonder if it would be too much to have you take your best communist crack at how you solve the nation’s spending problem.

    Being broke and going broker at the rate of 4 billion an hour is kind of a drag, but I’m sure you have a solution that will make me feel better.

    Feel free to use the words ‘proletariat’, ‘capitalist pigs’, and ‘ reeducation camps’ in your essay.

    Thanks in advance.

  5. artist on April 1, 2011 at 7:26 am

    Voter identification and verification of eligibility is an absolute must.

    ….

    Don’t know what WI is waiting for.

    May hurt them next Tue.

    Dumbasses.

  6. ATTILA on April 1, 2011 at 7:36 am

    We must all standby for the onslaught of illegals voting GOP.

  7. jan on April 1, 2011 at 8:14 am

    The reason Rex ‘assumed’ the participants in voter fraud were dems is because this is the MO of dems. Democrats push the boundaries of morality in their means, in order to achieve the end result they want. Their philosophy is, “If it takes encouraging illegals to vote, so be it.”

    I also agree 100% wih Artist’s post about WI waiting too long in pushing a voter ID bill. It’s absolutely insane that identification is not required for voting! But, then again, I guess if you don’t have to show a legitimate birth certificate to become president why pursue scrutiny in voting…..?

    The thing about sustaining an environment of morality, IMO, is that it needs a certain amount of oversight in a society. When ethical boundaries are dissolved, integrity tends to become diluted in the populace at large. That is what is happening to this country.

  8. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 8:30 am

    It doesn’t really matter in the long run if the libs get a temporary win in Wisconsin, which is ground-zero for much of crazed leftism. It would be like trying to push budget cuts in San Francisco.

    Reality is going to take care of everything. There is no money. It’s gone. And state after state after state, facing crushing budget deficits of which a primary component is unsustainable pension funds for state employees, are going to begin doing what they have to do. Witness Ohio this week.

    The Left can wail and caterwaul as usual, and try to end-run through the courts with friendly lib judges, but in the end they are on the losing end of the issue.

    This is where the fantabulism of the Left meets the iron-hard fist of reality.

  9. Warner on April 1, 2011 at 8:33 am

    “What is hilarious is that you assumed that these ineligible voters were Democrats!”

    Nobody said anything about ineligible voters.

    Pretty much every reply from you involves arguing against a straw man.

    And every post does nothing more than uncritically pass along the Republican Teabagger Propaganda Lie of the Day.

    I think you’ve inhaled too many petroleum fumes in your life.

  10. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 8:33 am

    ‘The thing about sustaining an environment of morality, IMO, is that it needs a certain amount of oversight in a society. When ethical boundaries are dissolved, integrity tends to become diluted in the populace at large. That is what is happening to this country.’

    It’s amazing you would write such a paragraph, unless you have been asleep in a cocoon for the last four decades. The Left has thoroughly and completely corrupted and corroded the modern culture–it has already happened to this country, a long time ago.

    Ethics and morality are now a post-modern irrelevancy–in any event, we are too broke to worry about them anyways.

  11. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 8:34 am

    Warner, are you back to go another round with utahprez?

    That reminded me of the Tyson-Spinks fight.

    Truth to power, Warner!

  12. Warner on April 1, 2011 at 8:36 am

    “Hey, dude, I know it’s on the wrong thread, but after your scintillating explanation of economics and gasoline prices, I wonder if it would be too much to have you take your best communist crack at how you solve the nation’s spending problem.”

    Hey, dude. You’re the idiot who thinks gas is at $4-5/gallon now and has never been that high before. Bluster and smarm cannot replace facts or obscure ignorance and stupidity, Phooleus.

    Like someone else pointed out in the other thread, my gas prices are hovering around $3/gallon now and have hardly budged in the last year.

  13. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 8:39 am

    Oh dear, the media elites are beginning to tire of their Messiah.

    The reason they’re beginning to distance themselves, at least the smart ones, is that they can now detect the distinct odor of a turd. Hence, it is time for an exit strategy and some revisionist history.

    The only ones left in the marxist’s corner in a year will be hardcore dead-end hamsters like Warner.

  14. Warner on April 1, 2011 at 8:42 am

    “Gas Prices are High! We need to Drill Baby Drill!”

    “There is No Money! We need to cut taxes and social programs we hate and privatize public services!”

    “Saddam has WMDs! We need to set up the biggest Defense Contractor boondoggle in history and attack!”

    Everyone is in on your little Shock Doctrine games guys. It’s amazing how easily and quickly you all snap onto them like bloodsucking parasites on the body politic. What mindless stooges. Gosh, Big Daddy Corporate America really loves you fools.

  15. jan on April 1, 2011 at 8:44 am

    The problem with trying to work with pension funds, cutting them back etc., is that public sector workers view them as their primary investments, funding their retirements. It’s like taking pabulum away from a baby or cap-nip from a cat! They are fully immersed in the idea that this is their money, and nobody better touch it.

    When you are in the private sector, this kind of mindset seems ridiculous. My investments are affected by the times and the economy. Nothing is set in financial cement for me and my husband, like the defined benefits seem to be for the public sector workers.

  16. utahprez on April 1, 2011 at 8:45 am

    Rexie said: “Just another example of a made-up problem designed to advance a partisan or corporatist cause: Democratic voter suppression.”, so the logical extension of this is that efforts to reduce “non-citizen” voters would suppress Democratic voter turnout. So yes, there was an inferential reference to ineligible voters by Rexie.

    As far as the article, the direct reference is to “non-citizens” who, by definition and force of law are “ineligible”.

    Therefore:

    “Non-citizen” = “ineligible voter” = an apparent concern for Democrats.

    There’s your critical thinking/critical reading lesson for the day.

    There is no straw man – I just posted the facts from the story. Rexie is the one who made his own connection to this being bad news for Democrats, i.e. “Democratic voter suppression” to quote him.

    Why would anyone have a problem with presenting no more identification to vote than it takes to sign up a kid for Little League or for an adult to buy beer or cigarettes? You libs seem to have no problem with that intrusion.

  17. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 8:51 am

    ‘Why would anyone have a problem with presenting no more identification to vote than it takes to sign up a kid for Little League or for an adult to buy beer or cigarettes? You libs seem to have no problem with that intrusion.’

    Or to buy a gun. Or the toilet or light bulb of your choice. Or any number activities in which the individual is exercising his own liberty and freedom.

    Yet on-demand abortion for a thirteen-year old? Hey, no problem, right this way. Rock on, Kermit.

    The Left, after all, has their standards.

  18. jan on April 1, 2011 at 8:52 am

    It’s amazing you would write such a paragraph, unless you have been asleep in a cocoon for the last four decades. The Left has thoroughly and completely corrupted and corroded the modern culture–it has already happened to this country, a long time ago.

    Ethics and morality are now a post-modern irrelevancy–in any event, we are too broke to worry about them anyways.

    1. I haven’t been in a cocoon.

    2. The statement made was more in reference to the cautionary quote by Adams, posted at the beginning of the thread.

    3. I haven’t gone as far down the cynicism path as you have, Phineas. Around me, in my life, I am still witness to individual displays of ethics and morality. It has not been extinquished or vanquished, just played with and grossly impeded by government overreach and meddling, IMO.

  19. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 8:53 am

    ‘They are fully immersed in the idea that this is their money, and nobody better touch it.’

    It doesn’t matter what their delusions are. The states are broke.

  20. Ken_phd on April 1, 2011 at 8:56 am

    Warner:

    “What mindless stooges. Gosh, Big Daddy Corporate America really loves you fools.”

    You earned the title of The Village Idiot in 2010. You well on your way to capturing it again in 2011.

  21. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 8:58 am

    ‘individual displays of ethics and morality’

    The statement was not about individuals. There are any number of honest and ethical people, informed by their own personal morality.

    The statement was about the culture. And if you can look around you at modern American culture today, after four decades of marination in Leftist filth, and claim that morality and ethics still guide the behavior and beliefs of Americans as a group, then we are going to have to disagree.

    It is long, long gone.

    Example–as the Titanic was sinking, the men automatically stood aside to allow women and children into the lifeboats, stoically accepting their own inevitable deaths. Now imagine you are on a sinking ocean liner today with a group of modern leftist men like Warner and McRock. How comfortable are you going to feel?

  22. jan on April 1, 2011 at 9:12 am

    I agree, the states are broke. But, public sector employees are ones who are like robotic trains. They put their life, on a what they believe to be a ‘secure,’ and unshakeable track. And even when those tracks are disrupted or demolished, they fail to connect the dots, continuing to believe the pension paradigm is oblivious and immune to any economical upheaval.

    For example, we have a very liberal friend who was so incensed by the signing of Ohio’s collective bargaining bill the other day, that he went outside and started splitting wood to get rid of his anger. His mantra is, raise taxes, leave the workers alone. There is no changing his perspective.

  23. Warner on April 1, 2011 at 9:19 am

    “You libs seem to have no problem with that intrusion.”

    So you want to intrude into the voting process. As if we didn’t have enough problems already with voter apathy and systemic fraud at the state party/judicial level.

    Thanks for clearing that up.

  24. Warner on April 1, 2011 at 9:19 am

    “His mantra is, raise taxes, leave the workers alone. There is no changing his perspective.”

    A Real American. Why should he change his perspective?

  25. jan on April 1, 2011 at 9:29 am

    Phineas, I see your point about lumping morality and ethical behavior into a nameless, faceless cultural group, in the rendering of your judgment. However, as a norm, my silver lining has been to look at and give credit to individual behaviors and accomplishments.

    IMO, the predilections of crowds are more often than not created by herd mentality, where there is very little critical thinking involved. The WI protesters are a perfect example of this. Therefore, my husband and I tend to have a moral compass and work ethic pointing in a different direction than the average crowd. And, it is from the seeds of such a tangible and surviving morality in which a better culture can be grown.

  26. ATTILA on April 1, 2011 at 9:31 am

    The only reason the left opposes voter ID to fight fraud is obvious, they are the ones engaging in it.

  27. jan on April 1, 2011 at 9:32 am

    Warner, while I love this friend, his perspective is quite narrow. He pays no taxes. So, there is no skin in the game for his cry to raise taxes. The hypocrisy of it is that when costs do affect him, he is the first one to complain. You can’t have it both ways.

  28. Warner on April 1, 2011 at 9:38 am

    AP – The unemployment rate fell to a two-year low of 8.8 percent in March, capping the strongest two months of hiring since before the recession began.

  29. Warner on April 1, 2011 at 9:40 am

    “The only reason the left opposes voter ID to fight fraud is obvious, they are the ones engaging in it.”

    So you’re saying it’s just like Republicans trying to destroy Government and regulations…criminals are the ones who hate government the most.

  30. utahprez on April 1, 2011 at 9:55 am

    Warner – I specifically defined what I termed “intrusions” as separate from voting…eligibility is a legal requirement set forth by federal and state law and by the 14th and 26th Amendments to the Constitution.

    If you have to prove your age as a matter of law, it also seems logical that you should have to prove your citizenship.

    Voter apathy is caused by having to identify yourself? If that is true, why do we have so many people with driver’s licenses? There never seems to be an issue with providing identification and proof of insurance to get a driver’s license.

    Now you are presenting the strawman.

  31. jan on April 1, 2011 at 10:05 am

    Everything dealing with business, one has to prove their identity. In many cases just a purchase requires some kind of photo ID. Why voting, something set forth in the Constitution, should be any different, and be even a cause for someone like Warner to argue and nitpick is a total mystery, and displacement of reason.

  32. Jussayin' on April 1, 2011 at 10:26 am

    Just trying to think outside the box… being that the unions don’t like the idea of their “hard won” pensions being affected, how about we leave them alone – pensions stay as they are, only the pensions get to be taxed to the 90% level.

    They are the ones going on about how taxes should be raised, lets see them put their money where their mouth is.

  33. jan on April 1, 2011 at 10:43 am

    Interesting proposition, Jussayin. It’s always injects curiosity into a scenario, when a juxapositional idea is inserted.

    My guess is that most of them would howl how unfair it is to tax away their future, giving them no incentives to work.

    Hmmm…but, isn’t that what the ‘wealthy’ are saying too, when they are taxed to death!

  34. phineas gage on April 1, 2011 at 10:51 am

    ‘His mantra is, raise taxes, leave the workers alone.’

    Does he know Warner?

    Well, since he was actually working, probably not…..

  35. Jussayin' on April 1, 2011 at 11:02 am

    Jan, I don’t believe that the Unions would agree to that, but it would be a means to put things into the context that they themselves are saying.

    To them, raising taxes isn’t personal. This is the means to make it personal to them.

  36. jan on April 1, 2011 at 11:28 am

    Jussayin

    In other words, walking in another moccasins might produce the same corns and calluses! LOL

    Phineas

    My good friend is an artist and actually buries his money. He doesn’t trust the banks, but depends on the government. Go figure! And, he knows lots of people like Warner, that is for sure. This guy is talented in his field, has a good heart, but is totally off base when it comes to looking at the world through his rose-colored glasses (mixed in with smoking too much weed). But he is a consistent voter. And, this is what we are faced with when going to the polls — these people’s ideas about governance canceling out those who think differently and more conservatively.

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